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  • Colonel Charles Coster, USA, Oak Brickyard Witness Tree Shadow Box
  • Colonel Charles Coster, USA, Oak Brickyard Witness Tree Shadow Box
  • Colonel Charles Coster, USA, Oak Brickyard Witness Tree Shadow Box
  • Colonel Charles Coster, USA, Oak Brickyard Witness Tree Shadow Box
  • Colonel Charles Coster, USA, Oak Brickyard Witness Tree Shadow Box
  • Colonel Charles Coster, USA, Oak Brickyard Witness Tree Shadow Box
SKU: WT-191

Colonel Charles Coster, USA, Oak Brickyard Witness Tree Shadow Box

$85.00Price

While the fighting that occurred in and around John Kuhn’s brickyard in the northeast quadrant of the town during the Battle of Gettysburg is not as well known as the many other actions of the three-day battle, it is no less significant. It was here on the afternoon of July 1, 1863, that 23-year-old Col. Charles R. Coster led a delaying tactic against a rapidly advancing Confederate advance from thennorth of Gettysburg. Less than a mile to his rear was high ground known as Culp’s Hill, ground that needed to be secured by the Union in order to secure a strategic advantage for the remainder of the battle. Coster was vastly outnumbered and held a weaker position to the oncoming Confederates. Nevertheless, he—with about 977 men—needed to delay their advance. He crossed the railroad tracks and then Stevens Run on a stone bridge to reach the brickyard. As they arrived, a cannonball struck the corner of Kuhn’s house and sent a shower of bricks fl ying. Coster placed his troops to prepare for the imminent attack. The brigade’s position was perilously poor; both flanks were unsupported and in danger of envelopment. The terrain was disadvantageous. To the north of the brickyard the ground rose abruptly, hindering sight. By the time the Rebels could be seen, they were only 220 yards away. Battle flags waving,the Confederates, about 3,000 total, advanced until a volley from the brickyard stopped them. They immediately returned fire. Coster’s men, kneeling or lying behind a thin shelter of fence built on a low embankment, began to suffer heavy casualties. Coster’s stand in the brickyard was inevitably brief. His men had time to fire only six to nine shots apiece before risking being overrun. With his regiment badly shot up and in danger of being surrounded, the order was given to retreat. While suffering more than 700 casualties, Coster’s action had the desired effect. His troops delayed the quickly advancing Confederates on that fi rst day of the battle. Union troops secured Culp’s Hill. Had they not, the outcome of the Battle of Gettysburg may have gone to the Confederates.

  • Gettysburg Sentinels creates products from the oak Witness Tree that once stood on the land that was John Kuhn’s brickyard at the time of the Battle of Gettysburg. His home still stands today on North Stratton Street in the northeast quadrant of town.

    Our shadowboxes includes imagery related to activities that occurred near the tree.  It also includes an engraved sample of the wood, an uncirculated 2011 Gettysburg Commerative US Quarter and an authentic civil war bullet.  Overal size is 8.75" x 8.75" x 2".

    All of our products include documentation related to the tree.

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